Tag Archives: Sober Girl

Must read alcoholism blogs

This week I wanted to give you a round up of some of the cool stuff on the web that relates to alcoholism and addiction. I hope you enjoy them as much as I have.

Spirituality
Russell Brand talks about how yoga has helped change his life and fill the void that he used drugs and sex addiction to before. As usual, he talks eloquently and humorously about his addiction and how his spiritual journey has changed him. It’s only a brief video and you can watch him here.
Russell is also the patron of Focus12 treatment centre in Suffolk, England. I will be donating a percentage of the profits from my UK sales of ‘Why you drink and how to stop: journey to freedom’ to Focus12. I trained there as a therapist and can personally attest to the amazing work they do with addicts.

Recovery tools
Beth Burgess’s blog on how to deal with difficult people has some great strategies to use. She rightly identifies that alcoholics (drunk or sober) sometimes have trouble dealing with other people. Unless you want to go and live in a cave somewhere it’s a skill we have to learn. The most important takeaway being; ‘don’t take it personally.’ You can read more about what she has to say here.

Eating disorders and hating our bodies
I posted this on my Facebook page (if you click ‘Like’ you’ll see what I post in your newsfeed). I just thought it hit the nail on the head regarding women, food and body image. Nearly every female client I have ever worked with (and a lot of men) have had food issues to deal with as well as alcoholism/addiction. It’s so sad that so many women just hate their bodies. As the mother of a little boy I want him to grow up with a love of his own body and physicality as well as an understanding and appreciation of what a healthy female body is, i.e not half starved.

Alcoholism myths
I’m a big fan of Carrie Armstrong‘s blog on the HuffPost UK. I did a post about her a last week, if you missed it you can read it here.

Caroline Armstrong, Life after the chair, www.lifeafterthechair.com, photographed by Yohannes Miller, www.mydigitaleye.com, www.yohannesmiller.com, my digital eye, makeup by Thamina Akther

Caroline Armstrong, Life after the chair, www.lifeafterthechair.com, photographed by Yohannes Miller, www.mydigitaleye.com, www.yohannesmiller.com, my digital eye, makeup by Thamina Akther

Carrie is carving out a niche for herself as a Sober Girl who challenges the myths and stereotypes around alcoholism and alcoholics. In her blog this week she challenges the story of ‘rock bottom’s,’ she argues that a rock bottom actually just means death. Because lots of people believe that to be an alcoholic things have to be really, really bad before they stop drinking and get help, this myth is then preventing people getting help. I also think the ‘inspiration to get sober’ or moment of clarity’ is a much more positive and empowering statement. I think she’s on to something. What do you think?

Why Sober Girls matter.

I want to introduce you to Carrie Armstrong.

Caroline Armstrong, Life after the chair, www.lifeafterthechair.com, photographed by Yohannes Miller, www.mydigitaleye.com, www.yohannesmiller.com, my digital eye, makeup by Thamina Akther

Caroline Armstrong, Life after the chair, www.lifeafterthechair.com, photographed by Yohannes Miller, www.mydigitaleye.com, www.yohannesmiller.com, my digital eye, makeup by Thamina Akther


We met, like most people these days on Twitter.
There are many interesting things to know about Carrie, but the most important, and only thing you really need to know is, she’s awesome.
Why’s that, I hear you ask?

Well, because she is a Sober Girl who is telling the world.

She is giving a face and a voice to sobriety.
Carrie is a TV presenter in the UK who also blogs for the UK Huffington Post.
She is also smart, funny, talented and gorgeous.

I got sober at 27 and there were no role models for me back then.
The people I saw who were sober, they were much older and I found it really hard to identify with them.
It never occurred to me that I was an alcoholic because I thought I was doing what everyone else my age was doing. Everyone I knew binge drank, partied or got wasted. It was normal, or so I thought.

We have created a culture that normalizes abnormal drinking.

I drank through the years of the ‘laddette’ culture – remember that? Girls who could drink the same as boys, who got up to the same antics and lived to tell the tale the next day on the radio/TV or in a magazine story.
These were my role models, they turned their ‘antics’ into funny stories, they made drinking seem so harmless and fun.
But here’s the rub; I was doing the same thing, I was drinking like the men, I was telling stories about my ‘antics,’ I was a wild party girl and it was awful.
I was miserable, I was scared, I most certainly wasn’t having fun. I knew something was wrong with me I just didn’t know what it was.

What I needed was someone like Carrie. Someone on the TV who was successful and fun, who was saying she used to be a party girl and it sucked. Someone who was proudly saying she was a Sober Girl. Someone who made sobriety look fun and attractive. What a mind blowing concept that would be.
More and more public figures are letting the world know they are clean and sober now. By doing so they are raising awareness of the issues relating to addiction and they are also being role models. We need this.

What Carrie is doing is re-branding sobriety. Away from the preconceived notion that ‘not-drinking’ is glum and boring. She is making it something to aspire to and for that I’m really grateful.

What Carrie needs is our support.
We can change this culture. We can show young women trapped in alcoholism and binge drinking that there is another way to choose. That being a Sober Girl is awesome.
I’m with Carrie.
Are you?

Carrie Armstrong is a TV presenter with Gaff TV and a contributor to The Huffington Post UK