Veronica’s story

Many people have asked me for my drinking story, I wrote this some time ago and decided to publish it. This is me, this is who I was and who I am now….

I think there’s two ways you can become an alcoholic. I think you’re either born that way or, you simply need to drink enough alcohol and become one.

Veronica Valli - always the party girl

Veronica Valli – always the party girl


I believe I was born an alcoholic.
I believe this, because I’ve always felt ‘different’. My earliest memories are of feeling ‘odd’, ‘uncomfortable in my own skin’. I felt like I was looking out at the world through a glass screen, I was on one side and everyone else was on the other.
I felt separate, alone, unconnected. It didn’t seem to matter what I did, I never felt like I truly ‘fitted in’ or ‘belonged’ anywhere. These feelings began long before I ever tried alcohol.

When I finally tried alcohol at around 15 it felt like a light bulb went on. All of a sudden, I felt complete, I felt ‘right’, and I had confidence and self-belief.
Drink did something to me, it made me feel normal.
I never drank ‘normally’, whatever that is. I drank alcoholically from the word go. I could never get enough of this substance that made me feel so good.
Initially I was just your regular teenage binge drinker, I could get into bars and clubs when I was underage and the whole point was to get as drunk as possible. At the time, it was what my entire peer group was doing to. I certainly wasn’t doing anything that different to most teenagers, but whenever I compared myself to them I knew I was different. I could tell they didn’t have the same feelings of desperation or disconnectedness that lived within me. As we grew up they naturally moderated their drinking and drank less where as I found that inconceivable.

At 15 I also experimented with marijuana. I’m never quiet sure what happened with my drug education, I must have missed that bit at school, as it never once occurred to me to ‘just say no to drugs’, or even question what they would do to me. I so desperately wanted to be liked and to feel normal that I said ‘yes’ to any substance offered to me.
I met my first serious boyfriend when I was 16 and shortly after left home. He was a recreational drug user and through him I tried LSD, Magic Mushrooms and Amphetamines.
I loved them; I used drugs regularly and partied every weekend. I was struggling through college and I barely passed my exams but I didn’t care because I though I’d found this group of people I belonged too and a lifestyle I enjoyed. I felt like I was living life on the edge, it felt glamorous and sophisticated.
For 2 years I really, really enjoyed taking drugs and getting drunk.
I had a great time and then at 17 everything went horribly wrong.
I had taken some LSD and had a ‘bad trip’, this had never happened before and I didn’t know how to handle it. I felt panicky and scared, I was seeing and hearing things and got very paranoid. The feeling of terror grew and even when I began to ‘come down’ the fear and panic didn’t leave, in fact they got worse. I now know I went into drug induced psychosis, but at the time I had no idea what was happening too me. The worse thing was I couldn’t tell anyone around me how I felt, I put on a ‘mask’ and pretended everything was ok. I was terrified of anyone finding out what was really happening I became imprisoned by my own fear.
My whole life was shattered. I was terrified and paranoid all the time and having at least a dozen panic attacks a day. I couldn’t get on a bus, go into a supermarket or sit in my own living room without having a panic attack and making some kind of excuse to leave. I could barely go to college, I couldn’t cope, I was having a breakdown and was most definitely suicidal. I used to stand at the bus stop waiting for a bus I was too scared to get on trying to summon the courage to jump in front of it.
Everyday of living was agony for me and I didn’t know how to carry on.
This went on for months and I was too terrified to tell anyone what was happening, I didn’t know how too. I couldn’t even begin to articulate what I was experiencing, I was too scared to say it out loud because if I did, it meant what was happening to me was real, and I was still clinging on to the hope that one day I would I wake up and be normal again.
Close to a breakdown I eventually went to the doctors and told him everything. He wrote me a prescription for Valium and recommended some counselling. I never went to the counselling but I did like the idea of being prescribed drugs to make me feel better. This was the worse possible thing to do. It started off a 10-year prescription drug habit. For years I visited different doctors explaining my symptoms of fear and paranoia and they would write me prescriptions for Valium, Xanax, anti-depressants. They always worked for a bit, papered over the cracks, but they never dealt with the root of the problem.

Veronica Valli - this was taken about a year before I got sober

Veronica Valli – this was taken about a year before I got sober


The next 10 years of my life from 17 to 27 were a living hell. I was never, ever free from fear; it was the overwhelming emotion I woke up to every morning. Some days I felt like I could hardly breath through the terror of having to get through the day and pretend to be normal.
After the incident with LSD I had stopped using illegal drugs completely and only drank alcohol, my drinking increased very quickly because it was the only thing that took away the fear. It took the edge off of my anxiety and I had a few hours of reprieve from the madness in my head and I could pretend to be ‘normal’.
At 17 my drinking shifted from ‘having fun’ to using it to cope with how I felt. I knew there was something very wrong with me, I just didn’t know what. I did try to get help, I looked everywhere, I went to doctors, counsellors, psychiatrists, psychologists, therapists, churches anywhere that offered some kind of hope. I was treated for anxiety or depression but never my alcoholism. The truth is, I either lied about how much I drank or, I was simply never asked, no one ever picked up on my drinking as being the real problem. Whatever treatment I was offered only ever gave me a temporary reprieve and inevitably I would revert back to familiar feelings of loneliness, isolation, despair and discontent. Drinking always gave me a temporary relief from these feelings.

I tried every method known to alcoholics to try to ‘fix’ my life. It is amusing to me now, to see how unoriginal I was in my attempts to try to make things ‘better’. Every alcoholic or addict I’ve known has tried the same methods.
At 19 I went to America to travel, I did this a lot in my twenties, spending time travelling round the world trying to escape myself. But always ending up in the same place again (alone, confused, scared and a failure). What I was really doing was running away from myself.
I’ve been to some really incredible glamorous places and I hated all of them because of how I felt.
Somehow I always managed to hold down a job and got through university but I was always just ‘holding on.’ I tried to ‘loose myself’ in relationships, I almost got married to a man I didn’t love because I thought that marriage would ‘save me,’ and everything would then be ‘fixed’. However all my romantic relationships were based on dishonesty, fear and neediness. I couldn’t believe anyone would want to be with me when they found out how disgusting I really was. I felt so unworthy of love that it was beyond my comprehension that anyone could really love me. So like a lot of alcoholics I just took ‘hostages’ because being alone scared me so much.

I was constantly searching, looking for answers.
I have a massive thirst for life and this is what really saved me. Because I remained curious I eventually stumbled across the solution for my problem. When I was drinking I always felt discontented, I knew I wasn’t reaching my full potential, I knew I wasn’t the person I knew I could be and I drank on these feelings because they were too painful to acknowledge to myself.

Veronica at 23 - I was at a wedding and started the night looking pretty good only to end up in my usual disheveled state.

Veronica at 23 – I was at a wedding and started the night looking pretty good only to end up in my usual disheveled state.


I moved jobs, countries, relationships, friendships believing each time that this would be the thing that would make me feel ‘ok’. I blamed outside circumstances for how I felt and believed if I changed these circumstances (which I did often) I would be happy.
Through out my twenties I drank heavily, more than I knew was good for me, I always sought a peer group who drank as much as I did. I drank before any social situation because I was too scared to face people; I drank before parties because I was scared there wouldn’t be enough booze for me to get the ‘buzz’ I needed. I drank anytime I felt scared and couldn’t cope. Towards the end of my drinking I began to sneak drinks and drink on my own, I preferred that to sharing my booze.
In my mid-twenties I started using cocaine whenever I drank because it enabled me to drink more. However cocaine gave me the worst ‘come down’s’ ever. I was suicidal. I would wake up the next day and felt like my soul had been scraped out and was lying on the floor next to me. I didn’t know how I was going to get out of bed let alone make it through the rest of my life. My feelings of loneliness and despair intensified.
Without a doubt their were moments of happiness, peace and calm through this period. I would have moments when I felt everything was going to be ok, but they were always fleeting, I could never hold on to them, the same inevitable dark feelings would return. I was slowly dying on the inside, it wasn’t the alcohol that was necessarily killing me it was the lies that I was telling my self. I had to tell lies to myself as it was the only way I could deal with the fear inside of me. I believe fear is the defining characteristic of alcoholism, no one understands fear the way alcoholics do.

I never became physically dependent on alcohol. I could always go for a period of time without it, usually I would switch to something else, prescription drugs, pot anything that helped me get through the day. I’ve known the shame and degradation of being a female alcoholic and sleeping with men I don’t like just to feel wanted. I’ve never been arrested, bankrupt, or fired, or many of the terrible things that have happened to alcoholics. At first I thought I couldn’t be an alcoholic because I wasn’t ‘qualified’, however I learnt that it isn’t the drinking and consequences that make you an alcoholic; it’s the thoughts and feelings that drive alcoholism. It was then that I finally understood what my problem really was.
As soon as I understood the problem I could then embark on the solution.
I got help from experts who understood alcoholism and joined a self-help group. For the first time in my life I realised I wasn’t alone.
Getting clean and sober was the hardest thing I have ever done, but there was no choice for me, I couldn’t go back to how I was living. I so wanted to live, to make my life count, to see what I was capable of. When I got sober these things at last became possible.
I always knew something was very, very wrong with me but I thought it was a rare mental health condition, not alcoholism. Alcoholism can’t be measured by how much you drink; it is much more a condition of thinking and feelings.

Today with my family

Today with my family


Finally, I became free of the prison I had made for my self; the only thing that had ever limited me was my own thinking. Recovery gave me a new perspective on life; it gave me back my self-belief and confidence. I am finally engaging in the process of reaching my full potential and becoming the woman I was meant to be. I no longer have a 50% life of just getting by, just coping. I am no longer scared, I am just the opposite, I am fearless in everything I do. I no longer worry whether you like me or not, because I love who I am. I wake up everyday and find something to be joyful about. Certainly my life has challenges in it, but none of them threaten to capsize me the way they used to, I relish challenges so I can learn and grow and become the best version of myself I’m capable of being.
Life is a wonderful adventure now instead of a scary threatening place. I live a life now beyond anything I could have dreamed off before. I am on fire with the possibilities there are in front of me.

My sobriety date is: 2nd of May 2000.

The importance of self care

You know self-care is important, right? I mean, it’s on your to-do list and just as soon as you get everything done, you’ll take care of yourself. So why does self-care always seem to be at the bottom of the list?

Self care in Spain with my bestie's.

Self care in Spain with my bestie’s.


I’m a therapist, so I totally get it, I know I need to take care of myself in order to serve others. But as a woman, I can also put my needs way down the list and the next thing I know I am running on empty. The first sign that I need to take care of myself, is when I start snarling at my husband. My husband is lovely, he really is. Incredibly supportive of me, he still thinks I’m the most beautiful woman in the room and just an all round good guy. But when my tank is empty, I’m just mean to him and he doesn’t deserve it.

That’s a red flag. I’ve talked about red flags before. They are important, pay attention to them. The information contained in them could be vital. So after hitting a low point last year, the importance of self-care really came home to me and I’ve made it my top priority.

I’ve just come off the most tremendous week of self care and I feel amazing. Inspired, connected, loved.
After my weekend in NYC at She Recovers I flew to Barcelona, Spain to spend three days with three of my oldest and dearest friends. It was tough. Finding a window in our schedules, arranging childcare, booking flights. Agreeing on where to go. But one of us had just been through a very serious health issue and all of those barriers just melted away. None of them were insurmountable challenges when you focus on what matters.
Friendship. The power of connection, supporting people you love by just being there for them. All of it filled my cups.

I spend most of my days with very small children so just being around adult people feels so enriching to me. And I just really, really needed that last week. I needed the joy and emotion of She Recovers and I needed the love and connection from my bestie’s. I really, really needed some self-care.

This will enrich me for a while, then at some point, if I let it, I’ll find myself running on empty again. But this time I’m not going to let myself get to that point. Self-care transforms me. I am a much better wife and mother when I take care of myself. By getting enough sleep, eating right and scratching out just a little bit of time each week for me. And making that time a priority. Top of the list. Everything flows from that.

What ever stage you are at in your recovery, whether you are early days or 17 years like me. What are you doing to take care of yourself? How high on your to-do list is self-care?

Cadaques, Spain 2017 - the perfect place to relax and unplug.

Cadaques, Spain 2017 – the perfect place to relax and unplug.

She Recovers Day 3 – and when I ugly-cried in front of 500 women

Marianne Williamson and me at She Recovers

Marianne Williamson and me at She Recovers


We have all been to a meeting, an event, to see an acclaimed speaker, and felt that they spoke only to you. That their words were already written on our souls, they just had to call them forth.
That’s what happened to me when I heard Marianne Williamson speak at She Recovers.

This wasn’t why I came. I came because I had the incredible honor of being invited onto the sober blogger team. I came to serve. I had no idea there was so much here that I needed. But my soul knew.

Marianne is the spiritual teacher I had been waiting for, for a long time. A Course in Miracles is my spiritual truth. This is the second time I had heard her and she delivers such a powerful and important message. I love how politically engaged she is. The personal is political, Marianne made that very clear. What we are doing to our planet, how women and children’s voices are silenced. She spoke to me today.

As I wrote yesterday, the theme of this whole event has been about ‘pain.’ Her quote ‘Let me not squander the hour of my pain’ pierced my soul.
I am in pain, but the enormity of it frightened me so much I have been holding it at bay. She Recovers showed me I could no longer do that.
I am a warrior. I have felt deep dark emotional pain before and I can get through anything. Anything. You can throw anything at me and I will get through it. I have done before. But just don’t throw it at my child, ok? Because that is a level of pain I am not prepared for. But it is here and it is mine. And. I. Will. Not. Squander. It.

Because Marianne spoke so passionately about the planet and the political situation we are currently in I wanted to ask her if she was going to run for Congress again. Like many of us, I have felt despair at our current political situation and I want a leader I can believe in.
I wasn’t expecting to full on ugly cry in front of y’all. I wasn’t expecting 500 women to surround me with unconditional love. I wasn’t expecting Marianne Williamson to lead the room in prayer for Luke’s healing from lead poisoning*.
I just wasn’t expecting that.
But my soul thanks you, for grace you extended to me.

This weekend has given me so much to think about. It has deepened my connections with you all. Every time I see you, I love you more. We are all in these incredible process’s, but what matters is we are all in it together.

I am still digesting what was said and how I feel. I know there is so much growth that will come from this. But for right now, I’m treasuring that Marianne Williamson came and said exactly what I needed to hear.

My son Luke. He likes mud.

My son Luke. He likes mud.

*If you are interested in learning more about lead poisoning in young children then please check out my friend Tamara Rubin’s website. Tamara is a mom whose children were lead poisoned by the house they were living in. She has since become an ‘unexpected lead expert’ and activist. She has worked tirelessly to help families and raise awareness of the situation and has been a great support to me. Her movie ‘Mislead’ is coming out soon and you can watch the trailer below.


She also has a ‘Go Fund Me’ campaign where she is raising money to buy an XRF machine (the best way to test any object for lead) so she can help more families. If you are able to support her in any way I would be very grateful.

#SheRecoversNYC – Day 2

When amazing women get together amazing things happen. Day 2 of She Recovers was just as amazing the first. Elena Brower did an amazing spoken word piece on her recovery and it was word perfect.
Then Nikki Myers spoke the truth on codependency. She called it the ‘disease of the lost self’. And how our need for outside approval keeps us in the darkness. There seems to be a theme emerging to the She Recovers event and it’s ‘welcome the pain.’ Which sounds crazy, but it started with Glennon last night. When she discussed not wanting to ‘waste the pain’ from the breakdown of her marriage, that instead, she wanted mine it. Because within the pain the riches lie.
‘Ain’t that the truth sister.

Elizabeth Vargas reading from her book

Elizabeth Vargas reading from her book


Elizabeth Vargas talked about anxiety and panic attacks which is something I identify with very closely. I think a lot of women suffer with anxiety and panic disorders and we mostly suffer alone. Isolated and terrified of feelings we have no control over and that can cripple us in seconds. It’s just always inspiring to see someone who you perceive to be successful and beautiful to admit that they suffered from crippling fear too. Because if they can say it, you can say it too.

I also attend Jennifer Matesa’s excellent workshop called ‘Desire un-numbed, or, as everyone else called it ‘sex and recovery.’ Jennifer gave an excellent presentation based on the findings from her book, where she identified a lot of common themes for women in recovery when they think about sex. They are scared they can’t get past their inhibitions, of unrealistic expectations, they have body hatred, sexual anorexia. Women around the room identified with each other and the most amazing and frank discussion on sex occurred. Cleary there is a need here for women to get together and talk openly and frankly about these issues and I look forward to see where Jennifer is going to go with this.

After dinner (shout out to Jean from Unpickled who won the first She Recovers ‘Hope’ award), we were treated to the wisdom of Gabby Bernstien. I will be honest and tell you I’m not a Gabby fan. I love ‘A Course in Miracles’ but Gabby has never resonated with me. I was keen to see her in person to see if that changed. I loved what she had to say and I think I got a couple of breakthroughs on areas I need to work on. There’s too much going on in my head right now to process it, but she also talked about not running from the pain but surrendering to it and letting God in.
I think I heard exactly what I needed to hear.

Gabby Bernstein

Gabby Bernstein


Lastly. Whilst I was filming one of the sober blogger live stream events, the gentleman (I didn’t get his name) who was taking care of the sound and recordings was asked how it was for him being at an all women event. He replied, ‘that he felt honored and humbled to be let into such an honest and revealing space, that he had learnt so much he never knew or understood about women and he was so glad he got to be here’.

Yes. Me too.

#SheRecoversNYC – Day 1

I have no words.

Sober blogger meet and great

Sober blogger meet and great


She Recovers was so much more than I expected. The minute I walked through the door I connected with amazing sober women. Sober Julie and I had a magical moment, then Kelly Fitzgerald the Sober Señorita arrived and I adore her. And was sat next to Jean from Unpickled and The Bubble Hour and she is the loveliest women you could ever meet. And so it went on. This coming together of amazing women in recovery.
The desire to be better, to be connected, as Dawn from She Recovers says ‘We are stronger together.’

Yes we are.

Just when I thought it couldn’t get any better Glennon Doyle Melton just blew us all out of the water with her stories and her sass. She made us laugh and she made us cry but most of all she was real. Real stories of what it’s like to be a warrior in recovery. She rocked it.

My arm involuntarily shot up to ask a question at the end. That wasn’t my intention. But I wanted to ask another mother in recovery what it was like to face fear around your child. And the love and support just poured out.

The weekend has only just begun…….

Thank you everyone.

Me and The Sober Señorita

Me and The Sober Señorita

Me (left) Jean from Unpickled (far right)

Me (left) Jean from Unpickled (far right)

She Recovers NYC – lets meet up

fullsizeoutput_25c6
We are just days away from the She Recovers event in NYC. I will be taking part in the ‘meet the bloggers’ event on Friday night at 5pm. The sober blogging team will be around all weekend and we love to hang out, so please be sure to come and say hi.
I will be giving 5 copies of my best-selling book ‘Why you drink and How to stop’ away to the first 5 readers who come up and introduce themselves.
I will also be celebrating 17 years of recovery with the very lovely Julie Maida from ‘Sober Mommies’. We are sober twins, sharing the exact same sober birthday. I will be blogging, Facebooking, Tweeting and Instagraming live all weekend.
If you can’t come then check out social media and become part of the She Recovers global group.
whyyoudrink7ebookfinalthumb

Sobriety – what I’ve learned so far….

Image courtesy of Prakairoj / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of Prakairoj / FreeDigitalPhotos.net


On May 2nd 2017 I celebrate 17 years of continuous sobriety. This did not come easy. It’s the hardest thing I’ve ever done and I made some big mistakes along the way. But through these mistakes I learnt some vital lessons that have helped me stay sober and become the best version of myself that I’m capable of being.
Long term recovery means you never stop learning and growing. Here are the things that have helped me learn and grow the most….

1. Just when you think you’ve nailed it…..
More than once I’ve thought ‘I’ve got this!’ ‘I know everything there is to know about recovery and addiction’, ‘I’ve dealt with all my issues…. I don’t really need to do anymore work on myself’. Yep, that usually happens right before I fall flat on my arse.

2. The growth never stops…
Ever. I mean, like never, ever stops. It smooth’s out a lot, things are definitely less bumpy. But there is always more to know and if you think you know, all there is to know, then see above.

3. We teach other people how to treat us.
My behavior will instruct you on whether to walk all over me, abuse me or hurt me. Instead, I can teach you how to treat me, with the boundaries I protect and by saying what I mean.

4. Say what you mean, mean what you say…
People do not need to hear me waffling on about my story, they do not need excuses, they generally just need a truthful ‘yes’ or a ‘no.’ my life became so much similar and calmer when I learnt how to do this.

5. I have to take responsibility for the experience I want to have.
By practicing the above I become responsible for the experience I am having right now. If events or circumstances are out of my control then I always get to choose my response. Therefore, I am responsible for my experience, in all circumstances, without fail.

6. If you don’t do the work, the shine will go off your recovery.
Being sober is just not enough. I need more than that. If I don’t put the work in, then I may stay sober, but I’ll stop feeling comfortable in my own skin. I’ll drift back to being discontent and fearful. Which means I have to keep being accountable and looking and reflecting on my behavior.

7. Give it away to keep it.
When my life came together in sobriety and my career and personal life went well I forgot to work with newcomers. Don’t do that. Giving of yourself is actually what fills your tanks.

8. Does it always need to be said and does it need to be said by you?
Not usually, I have discovered. Only give your opinion if explicitly asked, trust me, it saves a lot of time and trouble.

9. Exercise
Out of everything I have just told you, this is the most important one. Seriously, the benefits of exercising on your emotional well-being outweigh everything else you can possibly do.

10. Practice listening.
None of us listen well. Quiet the noise in your head and really focus on what people are saying. You will be amazed at what you hear.

11. It was never about you
OMG! The relief! It was never about me anyway. What YOU did or said, had bollocks all to do with my life. Everyone else is wrapped up in their own stuff too! Now I can stop worrying what other people think and get on with it!

12. Nothing is ever personal
See above. What other people do, say or think is always about them, not me. Even when it seems like it is, what other people do or say, always without fail, comes through the filters of their own experience, values and judgment. Therefore it is not personal to me but a simple expression of how they feel at that particular time. Took me a while to get that one.

13. The journey is joyous….
It was never the destination. We are always in a state of becoming the best version of ourselves. Uncovering who we really are is the point of it all. All I ever had to do was just keep moving.

14. Be still.
I am a human ‘being’ not a human ‘doing.’ Life is not an never-ending ‘To-do’ list. Sometimes it is in the stillness, or the quiet moments that we feel the most alive.

15. Love well
There was always much love here for me; I just refused to see it for a while. Always choose love, the chooses I have made in my life based on fear have never worked out. If I choose love, then things don’t always work out the way I want or planned but man, is the adventure a good one!

16. Friendships above all else.
At some point you will have cause to regret not making more effort to see your friends. We get busy, life gets in the way. But friendship is the soil your spirit needs to grow in. Good friends are hard to find, which is why treasuring the ones you have is more important that anything.

17. Ask for help
You will always need others to help you, friends (see above), or professionals. No matter how many years sober you have, life willthrough you a curve ball and it will be more than you can handle. Asking for help is skill that you can never forget. No matter how old you are.

The Opiod epidemic is the new AIDS crisis

I was driving the other day when a Prince song came on the radio. I felt so sad listening to him, his death was so unnecessary. Then it struck me, that despite a star of his magnitude dying of an opiate overdose, still, nothing has changed.
His death wasn’t the turning point.
50,000 people die every year from opiate overdoses. We are in the middle of a crisis and we have still no adequate response.

With permission by http://www.liahonaacademy.com/

With permission by http://www.liahonaacademy.com/


Andrew Sullivan wrote this piece on the Opiate epidemic, that it is our generation’s AIDS crisis. He is right and our response should be of the same magnitude.

In the 1980’s no one cared about AIDS. It only affected gay men, and in many people’s eyes they pretty much deserved what they got, with their devious immoral behavior. Communities were just devastated, the number of deaths increasing monthly. But no one did anything. Until a small group of outraged, devastated and determined people got together and started advocating. Motivated by anger, desperation and the inability to just stand by and watch this happen to their community, they started making a nuciense of themselves. They got in people’s faces and they kept demanding help until they got it.
They kept going until momentum started to build. Sure, it took ‘straight’ people dying of HIV for people to realize that this was a potential threat to everyone, to really get things going. But the response to the AIDS crisis really demonstrated what a small determined bunch of advocates can really do. Now AIDS research, prevention and treatment is extremely well-funded and understood. And most importantly the unnecessary deaths have stopped.

Why don’t we care enough about the opioid crisis? Across the country there are groups of angry and determined people who are demanding a response to this epidemic but we still don’t have the momentum and visibility required to really make a difference.
Chris Christie has just been appointed to the White House to tackle this crisis. I hope he succeeds, but it requires an effort on all fronts. More treatment, more education but most of all more regulations on the pharmaceutical companies who are pumping opiate based drugs into (particularly) rural communities. We need to be more angry about this. Because this is the main point, why aren’t the pharmaceutical companies being held accountable?*

I hear about the opiate crisis a lot on the news but what I don’t hear is talk of a plan. ‘We need to do something.’ Yeah, no s**t.
And still the deaths go on. It’s more like Prince and the (complete lack of a drug) Revolution.

*Senator McCaskill is launching an investigation into int the marketing, sales and profits of the largest opioid manufacturers.

Your Ultimate Recovery Giveaway!!!!!!!!!!!

Have you heard of the amazing She Recovers conference that is happening in NYC on May 5-9th?!
fullsizeoutput_25c6
This one of kind experience will feature keynote speeches from the top women in the industry, like Gabrielle Bernstein and Marianne Williamson! Plus, a special guest yoga class with Elena Brower!

Tickets are SOLD OUT but my blog readers have a chance to WIN a front row ticket to the Live Stream event! (That means you can watch in your PJs!)

PLUS,

You’ll also be entered to win a one of kind box filled with awesome gifts from the top bloggers that will be attending the show (so that you’ll feel just like you are in NYC with us)

Here are some of the amazing things you can win!

Here are some of the amazing things you can win!


AND one Ekka Recovery box!

Click HERE to be entered to WIN!

Blamers Anonymous

Image courtesy of Michal Marcol / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of Michal Marcol / FreeDigitalPhotos.net


This is a short video by Brene Brown on blaming. It’s brilliant and I sooooo relate to it.
My poor husband, if I can try and find a way to blame him for something, I will. She explains that ‘blame’ is just a way of discharging discomfort and pain. Blaming is how we discharge anger. We spend our energy raging and trying to figure out ‘whose fault it is.’ When we do this we miss an opportunity to grow.
And that’s our purpose here, to grow. Please check it out, it’s 3 minutes long and explains it perfectly.